8 Tips To Get the Most Out of Every Shoot

Photo: © Deborah Kolb

Photo: © Deborah Kolb

How often do you find yourself on a shoot with a singular mission or task in mind? You’re shooting for a specific client or adding to your personal portfolio and you work hard to get the shots you want with those specifics in mind. But what if you could do just a little more—an extra outfit on the model at this location, an added prop for another—to give your shoots even more value in the long run?

Outtakes and additional poses can help to build your library of images which come in handy for briefs on ImageBrief and will help you build a great library of stock images which have a variety of uses. (Shhh, little secret, ImageBrief will be rolling out a Premium Marketplace very soon.) So why not go the extra mile to make yourself even more marketable?

Deborah Kolb, one of ImageBrief’s most successful photographers, has made an art out of getting the most out of every single shoot. This has translated directly into her winning 21 briefs to date. When it comes down to it, the bigger your library of images to pull from, the more briefs you can enter relevant content in, and the more briefs you’ll win. Though, it almost goes without saying, you have to be a great photographer in the first place.

We collaborated with Deborah to come up with a list of the top eight tips for getting the most out of every shoot to build your library of images and to increase your chances of winning more briefs.

  • 1. Turn one shoot into two. To better increase the odds of winning a brief, I’ll look to shoot when there are a few briefs that I can submit to at the same time. For example, I’ll combine my lifestyle shoot with a fashion shoot [see the video below]. Fashion comes up from time to time on ImageBrief and I thought this was a good time to add it to my portfolio and it also worked nicely to do a good trade with my model who also wanted some shots for her portfolio. So when shooting the fashion styling, I shot both in studio and in natural light, as both types of briefs come up—the need for studio and natural light. It also doesn’t hurt to shoot each pose with several different objects or props.
Photo: © Deborah Kolb

Photo: © Deborah Kolb

  • 2. Search for trends within briefs. When I see various lifestyle briefs come up, I tend to shoot them because that tells me there’s a need and these types of briefs will come up again.
  • 3. Get all the angles. Always get a shot up close, then back away too. In other words, get the full story. Don’t forget to shoot both a horizontal and a vertical of the same scene, because you never know when a brief might call for one or the other.
Photo: © Deborah Kolb

Photo: © Deborah Kolb

 

  • 4. Always go for timeless over time-sensitive. When images have a timeless quality (i.e. free from objects or clothing that quickly date the pictures) they can have staying power. Remember, you could end up selling these photos years down the road.
  • 5. Always get a really good head shot. Often portrait briefs come up.
  • 6. Be generous with your models. Offer your models five edited head shots as a trade for your lifestyle shoot. (We know this isn’t necessarily a tip, it’s just good practice. Oh, and don’t forget to get the images properly released.)
  • 7. Make sure your shots match the brief. Once you’ve done that, then you can go beyond with a few extras. Only after you’ve submitted images to fit exactly what the client is looking for, create your own story based on the brief. Some clients like to see if you’ve got a vision and by going the extra mile you can relate your personal touch.
  • 8. Submit often. Your work needs to be great, but the more you submit, the more you increase your chances, not to mention, buyers get more familiar with your work.

Jacob Pastrovich is ImageBrief’s Marketing and Content Manager. Previously, he was the Assistant Director at the New York Photo Festival and Director of The powerHouse Portfolio Review. He has also served as the Editor of the NYPH Journal and the New Media Associate at powerHouse Books. You can follow him on Twitter: @jacobpast.

comments

About Jacob Pastrovich

Jacob Pastrovich is ImageBrief’s Marketing and Content Manager. Previously, he was the Assistant Director at the New York Photo Festival and Director of The powerHouse Portfolio Review. He has also served as the Editor of the NYPH Journal and the New Media Associate at powerHouse Books. You can follow him on Twitter: @jacobpast.