Film Ain’t Dead

Jena Ardell

Photo by Jena Ardell

The days of 35mm film are far from being over. The aesthetic of film photography is too hard to beat. Even a beaten-up, cheap as hell plastic camera bought for 10 bucks in a flea market can create interesting results. That’s the exciting thing about film photography- it’s experimental. Small, neat film cameras tend to create unique portraits. They’re less intimidating to a subject than a large and clunky DSLR. Old and unusual film cameras can disarm the person you’re photographing by being the talking point that breaks the ice.

Gil Lavi

Photo by Gil Lavi

In the last few years film photography has seen a resurgence, but this past year film photography techniques have been particularly apparent in pop culture. Double exposure has seen a rise in popularity stemming from its use in the opening titles of True Detective, after which it spread like wildfire through Pinterest, and bubbled up to the mainstream where it was the most notable aesthetic feature of Taylor Swift’s latest music video.

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True Detective Opening Credits – Copyright HBO

The accessibility of high-quality smartphone cameras right now means that everyone can be a photographer, so a digital backlash, particularly from millennials, makes sense. The art of film photography is hard to compete with. The finite amount of film in your camera makes you extremely selective when framing a shot, and  there’s nothing more satisfying than the delayed gratification of developing a roll of film. The results are unpredictable, but film burns and light leaks are what make certain shots.

Baja Holga Palms #1

Photo by Cate Brown

 

We’ve put together a collection of analogue-inspired images – a celebration of kicking it old school in a digital world. So if a job you’re working on calls for that 35mm feeling, check it out.

Simon Moss is the CEO and Founder of ImageBrief, Inc. Simon has 16 years experience across photography, image licensing, influencer marketing, startups and creating products from ideation to execution and then taking them to market.

Simon has presented on Crowdsourcing Creativity at Vivid Festival, Sydney Opera House, Mumbrella 360, AIMIA Summit, New York Photo Festival 2012 and Crowdsourcing Week in Singapore 2013. Simon was a panelist at the DMLA conference in October 2015 discussing on-demand photography and a panel member at the IDG Capital Conference in Beijing, China.

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About Simon Moss

Simon Moss is the CEO and Founder of ImageBrief, Inc. Simon has 16 years experience across photography, image licensing, influencer marketing, startups and creating products from ideation to execution and then taking them to market. Simon has presented on Crowdsourcing Creativity at Vivid Festival, Sydney Opera House, Mumbrella 360, AIMIA Summit, New York Photo Festival 2012 and Crowdsourcing Week in Singapore 2013. Simon was a panelist at the DMLA conference in October 2015 discussing on-demand photography and a panel member at the IDG Capital Conference in Beijing, China.