What Not To Do: 6 Tips From ImageBrief’s Photo Editor

Photo: © Ken Pao

Meet ImageBrief’s Photo Editor, Darcy Rogers. Photo: © Ken Pao

At ImageBrief, we have several teams that work tirelessly to ensure our whole machine is well-oiled, nimble, and able to hit top speed. One team makes sure photographers are getting their work in front of clients, our developers are constantly improving and innovating our platform, another team ensures clients are able to find the images they need for their campaigns, and perhaps one of the most important roles in the whole mix is our photo editor, who looks at every single image that gets submitted to every brief. That’s right, an actual person looks at every single image before it ever gets in front of the client. Who’s behind the wheel? It’s Darcy Rogers, an experienced photographer with a keen eye and laser-like attention to detail.

Some of you might ask, “Why does a platform like ImageBrief need an editor?” The short answer, is to make sure that our clients only see photographs that fit the brief they put forward, ensuring they’ll come back and purchase more images from our photographers. Believe it or not, since photographers are visual people, they sometimes might not read the details on a brief. This type of behavior can cause some head scratching for clients and Darcy is there to make sure off-brief photographs don’t make it through, which keeps clients happy.

Want to make sure your images make it through to be seen by the client? Darcy has six tips to make that happen:

  1. Always follow the directions of the brief. I can’t stress this enough. For example, if the buyer states they want vertical images and you submit horizontal photos, they’ll be rejected outright. It’s just a simple matter of following directions.
  2. Be relevant! Submit photographs that are current, i.e. not an outdated look, bad on-camera flash. Your photos should be technically sound and of high quality.
  3. Submit images that are commercially viable. For example, photos that have good spacing for the copy text for ads do very well. If I can envision the image being featured in the client’s ad, I’ll approve without a doubt.
  4. Be mindful of logos, trademarks, etc.  If there are easily-identifiable logos, the image will be rejected due to trademark issues. Here’s a blog post explaining that a bit more. If your photo contains people, make sure you have model releases. If you don’t, the client likely can’t use them, unless it’s for editorial purposes.
  5. Watermarked images will be rejected. Just don’t, please.
  6. I’m always on the lookout for stellar images—nice emotions, good composition, interesting expressions, gorgeous light, unique style, you get the picture. These are the images that not only make it through, but I’ll also be more likely to recommend them to the client.

One last piece of advice: Consistently shoot new work. This will provide new options for you to submit. By visiting and interacting with ImageBrief often, photographers will also have a better sense of what type of images our buyers need.

More About Darcy
Photo: © Darcy Rogers

Photo: © Darcy Rogers

Originally from San Francisco, Darcy has been living in New York City for the past four years and has shot for clients like Manhattan College, Inked Magazine, The L Magazine, and Time Out New York. As a photographer, she understands the nuances of the profession and as the bridge between photographers and clients, she’s a stellar advocate for both sides. “I like that ImageBrief has a new and unique business model. I also like that photographers have control over how their image will be used and that they can decide if they want to participate in a brief based on pricing, brief details, and license terms. I feel that ImageBrief is working to promote photographers and support client needs.” She’s an active Instagrammer and you can find her here.

 

 

Jacob Pastrovich is ImageBrief’s Marketing and Content Manager. Previously, he was the Assistant Director at the New York Photo Festival and Director of The powerHouse Portfolio Review. He has also served as the Editor of the NYPH Journal and the New Media Associate at powerHouse Books. You can follow him on Twitter: @jacobpast.

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About Jacob Pastrovich

Jacob Pastrovich is ImageBrief’s Marketing and Content Manager. Previously, he was the Assistant Director at the New York Photo Festival and Director of The powerHouse Portfolio Review. He has also served as the Editor of the NYPH Journal and the New Media Associate at powerHouse Books. You can follow him on Twitter: @jacobpast.